“A Bing Thing”

bing bunny dvdBing, the toddling, pre-schooler bunny on CBeebies is the star of a new DVD hitting the shelves on March 30th. We were invited along for a screening in Central London last weekend.

It’s a CBeebies show for toddler and pre-school aged children and their families. Episodes are narrated and seen from the point of view of Bing, the bunny who seems between three and four years old and Flop, an orange sock body who seems to be Bing’s grown up. He’s smaller than Bing, which reinforces the idea that the show is really about and for the child. The point of view in the animation often pans to “Bing height.” I wonder if the kids really notice these things. . .

But since we grown ups will be watching also, the writers have given us lovely moments to keep us entertained. Bing’s grown-up, Flop, is very, very patient. Something we grown ups can certainly learn from. And, I have to admit, he uses some good parenting methods.

red Balloon

Photo from the “Balloony” entry of Disney Wikia.

  I was happy to see a thoughtful nod to established childrens’ stories: “Bye-Bye” reminded me of the red balloon in the film versions of A.A. Milne’s Classic Winnie the Pooh stories. Bing plays joyfully with a balloon in his living room until it pops and he has to then, with the guidance of the loving Flop, deal with the end of the fun. While I won’t be setting up a bye-bye box in our home for broken toys, I’ll admit it might not be a bad idea if a child has trouble coping with broken toys or giving something up.

For the children, Bing is a mirror of their lives, replete with the fun and frustrations of the toddler years. He’s got a few friends and two bunny cousins, one a little older (“Coco,” my girls’ favourite character) and Charlie, a younger crawling baby. He’s also got friends the same age–an elephant (your child’s sensible and calm friend) and a panda (your child’s friend who marches to his own beat and doesn’t like trousers). This cast helps to illustrate an array of scenes of sibling or playmate interaction within an early years group. A lesson is learned and retold by Bing in each episode. It’s good social and emotional learning fun. And the Banana song is awesome.

My three year old daughter loved the episode with Brenda the blender and has been singing the banana song since yesterday. This morning, she reminded me that the banana went poo into the Brenda and chuckled. It was one of those moments when you realise that they really were paying attention and making sense of what they’re seeing. My four year old daughter’s favourite was, predictably, the one with Bing and his cousins playing blocks. . . Obsessed, she is with rainbows and putting blocks in orderly lines and towers, usually right where I need to walk.

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