Oh, Just the School Starting Age Issue. . .

Excerpted from the University of Cambridge article “School Starting Age: the Evidence“:

“Earlier this month the “Too Much, Too Soon” campaign made headlines with a letter calling for a change to the start age for formal learning in schools. Here, one of the signatories, Cambridge researcher David Whitebread, from the Faculty of Education, explains why children may need more time to develop before their formal education begins in earnest.”

In the interests of children’s academic achievements and their emotional well-being, the UK government should take this evidence seriously

– David Whitebread

130924-back-to-school

“Back to School”. Homepage banner image by Woodley Wonderworks via Flickr Credit: Nick Page from Flickr.

In England children now start formal schooling, and the formal teaching of literacy and numeracy at the age of four. However, the UK’s Department of Education states clearly that compulsory school age is five.  Children born in the summer months, like mine, spend the entire first year at school in Reception class before they reach compulsory school age. Yes, she will be playing. But she will also start her journey in formal learning, in a formal setting, learning phonics and arithmetic, even ICT.

Am I happy about this? Not particularly, no. I am much happier to have her at home singing her ABCs, visiting the playground, playing with her sister, and freely using her imagination. At least, we have secured the consent of her school to allow her to attend part-time during the Reception year.

I have witnessed the Herculean efforts of the campaigners who head the Summer-born Campaign, giving advice to parents with similar concerns about deferring or delaying admission for their child to primary school. They do this day and night, answering queries that Local Authorities and the Department of Education will not. They help parents to exercise their rights under the law, to wait until their child is five to start formal education, in the Reception year. These parents are successful sometimes, but sadly, some–even those whose children were prematurely born or have developmental issues–are flatly and discompassionately denied. One can only guess that bureaucratic expediency is chosen over the welfare of these children. Or else what?

In our case, we are simply concerned that, but for a few weeks, our daughter would have started her journey in formal education next year. So we lose an entire year at home. We have been reassured by anecdotal evidence that she will cope, and because she’s bright and self-motivated, she will “do well.” Our response is, “Yes, that’s great. We agree. But we wanted that to start when she’s actually of compulsory school age.”

charlie and lola too small for school

Read by Pre-School Platinum of YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B8fdu9PMgNo

There is a universe of common sense in the Charlie and Lola book, I am Too Absolutely Small to Go to School. In it, Charlie asks four-year old Lola, “Don’t you want to read words?” and Lola answers “I don’t need to read words and I’ve got all my books in my head. If I can’t remember, I can just make them up.” Lola eventually consents to go off to school, but on her terms. And the school depicted in Charlie and Lola is hardly one of ‘schooliforms’ and rules and formal lessons.

We understand that not all children have the supportive, loving and stimulating homes they so very much deserve, and that this is behind the impetus of the current government to consider the start of formal education at an even earlier age. But is starting formal education in the tender ages going to be the answer to Britain’s social problems? Because it does seem as if recent gestures by Education ministers are aimed at curing social problems rather than reforming the Education system.

And clearly, the research presented by Cambridge, states that the start of formal education, to promote educational goals, needs to go in the OTHER direction.

So here we are, stuck in a malfunctioning politico-educational system in which academics, educators, and parent-led groups are becoming advocates for childrens’ rights and doing battle against Education policy makers and politicians who can’t see the forest for the trees. As a reminder, the government’s obligations under the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child states that there is an “obligation to ensure that the child’s best interests are appropriately integrated and consistently applied in every action taken by a public institution.”

The Research and Political Action

“A recent letter signed by around 130 early childhood education experts, including Whitebread, published in the Daily Telegraph  (11 Sept 2013) advocated an extension of informal, play-based pre-school provision and a delay to the start of formal ‘schooling’ in England from the current effective start until the age of seven (in line with a number of other European countries who currently have higher levels of academic achievement and child well-being).

We were curious about where the UK stands in relation to the rest of Europe on this matter and, indeed, how these children are faring in comparison with ours.  Compulsory ages for the start of school throughout Europe from the National Foundation for Educational Research’s web site:

4

Northern Ireland

5

Cyprus, England, Malta, Scotland, Wales

6

Austria, Belgium, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Republic of Ireland, Italy, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland, Turkey

7

Bulgaria, Estonia, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania , Poland, Serbia, Sweden

So have you seen now that the countries who start later have the best results from education?

Let’s use research—-our own and that of the experts–to help determine Education policy that’s in our childrens’ best interest. Let’s leave the anecdotal evidence to the chat boards.

Please read David Whitebread’s original article here.

In England children now start formal schooling, and the formal teaching of literacy and numeracy at the age of four.  A recent letter signed by around 130 early childhood education experts, including myself, published in the Daily Telegraph  (11 Sept 2013) advocated an extension of informal, play-based pre-school provision and a delay to the start of formal ‘schooling’ in England from the current effective start until the age of seven (in line with a number of other European countries who currently have higher levels of academic achievement and child well-being). – See more at: http://www.cam.ac.uk/research/discussion/school-starting-age-the-evidence#sthash.MpcyBeRB.dpuf
Earlier this month the “Too Much, Too Soon” campaign made headlines with a letter calling for a change to the start age for formal learning in schools. Here, one of the signatories, Cambridge researcher David Whitebread, from the Faculty of Education, explains why children may need more time to develop before their formal education begins in earnest. – See more at: http://www.cam.ac.uk/research/discussion/school-starting-age-the-evidence#sthash.MpcyBeRB.dpuf
Earlier this month the “Too Much, Too Soon” campaign made headlines with a letter calling for a change to the start age for formal learning in schools. Here, one of the signatories, Cambridge researcher David Whitebread, from the Faculty of Education, explains why children may need more time to develop before their formal education begins in earnest. – See more at: http://www.cam.ac.uk/research/discussion/school-starting-age-the-evidence#sthash.MpcyBeRB.dpuf

Earlier this month the “Too Much, Too Soon” campaign made headlines with a letter calling for a change to the start age for formal learning in schools. Here, one of the signatories, Cambridge researcher David Whitebread, from the Faculty of Education, explains why children may need more time to develop before their formal education begins in earnest.

In the interests of children’s academic achievements and their emotional well-being, the UK government should take this evidence seriously

David Whitebread

– See more at: http://www.cam.ac.uk/research/discussion/school-starting-age-the-evidence#sthash.MpcyBeRB.dpuf

Summer-Born Campaign Reports Positive first meeting with Chairman of the Education Select Committee

An update signalling progress from the Summer-Born Children campaigners!

summerbornchildren

Graham Stuart MP On Tuesday 13th May 2014, summer born campaigners Michelle Melson, Pauline Hull and Stefan Richter, together with Annette Brooke MP, met with Graham Stuart, Chairman of the Education Select Committee in his Parliament office.

The following is a summary of this meeting:

*Having already forwarded our January 2014 summer born report via email, we summarised the very serious problems being experienced by parents of summer born children, both during attempts to enrol their child in school at compulsory school age and later in their education when forced to skip an academic year, and we outlined our growing concerns about how the Department for Education is handling the situation.

*Mr. Stuart was very shocked by some of the cases we described, and expressed some surprise at the opposition to allowing admissions flexibility for summer born children; he was already aware of research showing disadvantages for some summer born children, and suggested that allowing…

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Primary Admissions Day meltdown

Today is the big day. Parents across the country have been waiting to hear the results of their primary school admissions applications. Some have found out already. I was up late, reading the threads on Mumsnet and people were cyber-hand holding since early in the day yesterday. At midnight, some had their news in hand.

But some of us are still waiting. And waiting. I am waiting on an email from Redbridge Council to arrive sometime after 6pm today. So, sometime after the girls have had their dinner, possibly a bath, I will be glued to my iPad waiting for an email. Feels a little like waiting for that guy to call back in high school. . .

Adding to this stress is the fact that I’m very reticent about sending her to school in September anyway, as she is a summer-born child and still, today, just three years old. She’s having a big old meltdown at the moment after I tore out a sheet of colouring paper for her baby sister and started colouring it. Apparently, I wasn’t supposed to do that. It has caused her to come apart.

Is she ready for school? She will be 4 years old on August 1 and won’t be 5 years old (compulsory school age) at ANY time during the Reception Year. We thought hard about trying for a deferral, as is our legal right, but were discouraged because our borough is very oversubscribed and we wanted her to have a place at a specific school. We couldn’t risk it; we felt we had to apply, though we have the legal right to pursue the deferral.

We shouldn’t feel that way about exercising our rights under the law.

My daughter is still whimpering after she has tried cleaning her colouring page with water and it has fallen to pieces. Is she ready for school? Sometimes I think yeah, maybe; sometimes I think NO WAY.

The Summer-Born Campaign has this to say about today’s decision and how it affects families with children born in the Summer (April to August):

“Today is primary offer day.  In addition to the worry and stress that parents are going through if their child is not offered a place in their preferred school, for parents of summer-borns wishing their child to start school in reception class AT compulsory school age this stress is significantly magnified.  Different admissions authorities are at liberty to reach different decisions for the SAME child.  Parental preference  is effectively removed if one of those admission authorities (either school and/or local authority) refuses to admit these children into reception class.  They are left with whichever admission authority will accept their child into reception, which may not be in a preferred school.  They may also be denied access to a reception class education at all and be forced to miss this crucial year and join Year 1 in any school that has a place.  As the School Admissions Code was amended so that no child should be forced by the admissions process to miss even one term of reception class, it is scandalous that admission authorities and the Department for Education now think it is reasonable for a child to miss the whole of reception class – simply for starting school at compulsory school age.”

If you’d like more information, please visit the blog: summerbornchildren.org

 

Toward Legal Clarity for ‘Summer born’ Children

The campaigners for Flexible Admissions for Summer-born Children have a unique opportunity to present their case to a Dept of Education Minister.

This campaign’s aim is help parents who want their child to begin Reception year aged 5, and not aged 4 (those born between April and August). The law is unclear about this and local authorities and schools often don’t know or misapply it.

The campaign is working toward greater legal clarity for these families and they would like to have your personal experience on record!

Anyone with experience of considering delaying admission for their child to Reception (whether you went through with it or not) is invited to answer.

From Summerbornchildren.org:

New Survey for Parents of Summer Born Children

c artwork for cufflink april 2011If you are the parent of a summer born child and in recent years have applied or thought about applying for a Reception class place for your child(ren) when they reach compulsory school age, PLEASE COMPLETE THIS ONLINE SURVEY a.s.a.p.

The more responses we have, the better. Thank you.